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Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders :Changes from DSM IV to DSM 5

Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders :Changes from DSM IV to DSM 5

Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders :Changes from DSM IV to DSM 5

  1.  Two changes were made to Criterion A for schizophrenia: 1) the elimination of the special attribution of bizarre delusions and Schneiderian first-rank auditory hallucinations (e.g., two or more voices conversing), leading to the requirement of at least two Criterion A symptoms for any diagnosis of schizophrenia, and 2) the addition of the requirement that at least one of the Criterion A symptoms must be delusions, hallucinations, or disorganized speech.
  2. The DSM-IV subtypes of schizophrenia were eliminated due to their limited diagnostic stability, low reliability, and poor validity. Instead, a dimensional approach to rating severity for the core symptoms of schizophrenia is included in DSM-5 Section III to capture the important heterogeneity in symptom type and severity expressed across individuals with psychotic disorders. 
  3. Schizoaffective disorder is reconceptualized as a longitudinal instead of a cross-sectional diagnosis— more comparable to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder, which are bridged by this condition—and requires that a major mood episode be present for a majority of the total disorder’s duration after Criterion A has been met. Criterion A for delusional disorder no longer has the requirement that the delusions must be nonbizarre; a specifier is now included for bizarre type delusions to provide continuity with DSM-IV.
  4. Criteria for catatonia are described uniformly across DSM-5. Furthermore, catatonia may be diagnosed with a specifier (for depressive, bipolar, and psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia), in the context of a known medical condition, or as an other specified diagnosis.